TREKKING POLE INFORMATION

Looking for guidance on how to best use your trekking poles? We have a lot of resources to help answer your questions. Our video below and blog post on the subject should provide most, if not all, of the answers to your questions. If those do not help, please refer to the FAQ section below.

 

 

Trekking Pole FAQ

Quick Lock
Unlatch each of the quick locks and tighten the thumb screw to the point that it is difficult to close the quick lock. If the thumb screw is too loose, even if the lock seems to be holding, under extended use or sudden downward force on the pole, the sections may slip – make sure your locks are secure before using them. Periodically, check your quick locks to make sure they haven’t loosened. When storing your poles, some folks like to release the lock to relieve pressure on the components – just make sure your secure all parts so that you don’t lose a section on the trail!!

Twist Lock
You may need to remove the section and adjust the inner mechanism (depending on the pole, this may be red or black). There is a “locking mechanism” at the top of each section which you can turn slightly to enlarge the expansion mechanism (clockwise). Then insert it back into the pole and twist to lock. Do not take the “locking mechanism apart – we can’t warranty the pole if that has been tampered with. Turn the upper pole section clockwise to engage the twist lock.

Here is the recommended use of the strap and grip. If you need to lengthen or shorten the strap, you can pull the plastic wedge out slightly and then tug on the loose end to shorten the loop or pull on one side of the loop to shorten it. Firmly replace the wedge when you are done to hold it in place. The first time you pull the wedge out, you may need a tool since they have been firmly inserted in the manufacturing process.

For most uses, no tips are needed. By design, the carbide tip is there to provide greater grip on most surfaces, tips defeat that purpose, in general. The rubber tip that comes on the pole protected the carbide tip during shipping. It can be used on fragile terrain or to protect floor surfaces (some trails – Machu Picchu require them). The “boot” tip is great crossing large boulders or for extended downhill or for added stability for someone requiring assistance on level ground. The sand/mud basket is helpful in deep sand or mud but for general use is not needed and only adds weight. The snow baskets are for use when walking in snow or snowshoeing. Do not use your trekking poles for skiing, either alpine or Nordic.

In general, adjust the sections equally so that when your arm is at rest by your side, your elbow is held at a 90-degree angle when holding the grip. For extended uphill, some people shorten the pole or you can simply use the lower part of the pole grip. Our twist lock and quick lock poles be extended to 54” from 26”; our folding poles extend between 45-55”.

There isn’t a great way to explain this as it become a matter of personal preference and use. In general, note how your arms normally swing when walking – you are going to use the poles the same way. Some people use them in a single motion when climbing steep hills or steep descents. There are some great videos online as well.

A few people swear by the anti-lock feature. Others don’t feel the benefit at all; those that do like them, feel they are a benefit on downhill. Think about if you really want or need a shock absorber before you focus on poles that have them just because you’ve heard of the feature.

No – this is a surprisingly common mistake. You can gently reinsert the section into the pole, taking care with the inner mechanisms! If you have one of our twist lock poles, you may need to remove the section and adjust the inner mechanism (depending on the pole, this may be red or black). There is a “locking mechanism” at the top of each section which you can turn slightly to enlarge the expansion mechanism (clockwise). Then insert it back into the pole and twist to lock. Do not take the locking mechanism apart – we can’t warranty the pole if that has been tampered with. Turn the upper pole section clockwise to engage the twist lock.

You can take the three sections of the pole apart and place crosswise in a checked suitcase if they are too long to fit a small suitcase. At your destination, gently reassemble the poles taking care with the inner mechanisms! As of this writing, TSA does not allow trekking poles in carry on luggage. There is an exclusion if the poles are used for stability but you will need to research this.

Carbon fiber is lighter, stiffer and generally stronger, but if the poles take an impact like a fall or get caught in a rock and you over-torque the pole, you can break a section. Aluminum is slightly heavier, under the same circumstances at noted above, they may dent or bend. Generally, an aluminum pole section can be bent back into shape but a dent will remain.

Cork and EVA (rubber) offer different advantages. Cork grips are a favorite because they break into the shape of your hands with extended use. They are cooler than rubber grips and provide some absorbency if your hands get sweaty or the grips get wet. They will discolor with use but that is a sign you are hitting the trail! Rubber grips don't absorb any water or perspiration but some folks find them to be more comfortable to grip for extended periods. The grips on all of our poles are the same size.

There is a simple answer to this – NO. Our trekking poles are designed for trekking and not for the excessive torque that skiing puts on a pole that can break or collapse under that kind of pressure. We do not warranty the poles for this use.

Trekking poles are an essential tool for hiking and mountaineering. Trekking poles allow your arms and core to help propel you forward and upward – climbing unnaturally high steps, crossing fallen trees, fording streams, slippery logs or bridges, etc. Use your poles to probe uncertain terrain, even getting into that alpine lake for a swim. Poles reduce the impact and fatigue on your legs, knees, ankles, and feet. The greatest benefit is when going downhill – the poles can slow your descent and save your knees from excessive and repetitive impact.

Walking with poles can help you establish and maintain a consistent rhythm, which may increase your speed. This is especially true on flat terrain. Trekking poles are great for all ages – poles provide wonderful stability for any age and level of health and for crossing all types of surfaces – mud, snow, ice.

Neighborhood dog annoying you? Use your pole to keep him a safe distance from you (or larger or menacing wild life out on the trails!) Trekking poles can also double as a medical splint.

You can purchase replacement parts on our website – see Trekking Pole Parts in the left hand product menu. US and Canada shipments only.

You can purchase replacement parts on our website – see Trekking Pole Parts in the left hand product menu. US and Canada shipments only.


Replacement Parts

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* Cascade Mountain Tech replacement parts are designed to be use for only Cascade Mountain Tech trekking poles, we do not advise using with other manufactures product.*

More Trekking Pole Videos

For product-specific videos, please refer to our product pages.